Day 563 – Fire down south

We weren’t in Agulhas this weekend, but since late this morning, we’ve been following the progress of a bushfire in Struisbaai, from afar.

Google Maps’ new wildfire layer isn’t active here yet (or anywhere else?), so this is from AFIS. And despite some of the blocks covering some of the houses, thanks to the work of the Overberg FPA and their firefighting pals, nothing of value has been damaged. Yet.

May be an image of standing, fire and outdoors

“Yet” because the fire is still not under control:

This fire has a high risk of further spread. Wind conditions are not favourable.

It’s likely to spread west, driven by the strong northeasterly wind that’s blowing down there at the moment. And that’s bad news for the Agulhas National Park and – potentially – for Suiderstrand (red dot):

…both of which which lie pretty much due west of Struisbaai.

I’ll be keeping a sharp eye on the official information channels over night, and hoping that the firefighters can get access to somewhere in front of the line and get a hold on the fire.

Safe out, guys.

* second image via Top Coastal Security

Day 562 – All the precautions in place

Great news! /s

The Jacob Zuma Foundation – essentially the organisation of his cronies who oversaw the theft of trillions of Rands during his presidential tenure – has announced a “Welcome Home Prayer Day” for their allegedly ailing idol.

Current Covid regulations allow for stupidly large gatherings of 750 indoors and up to 2000 outdoors, but the organisers of this event likely won’t give a flying fuck about those sort of rookie numbers. In fact, they’d love to make a statement of support for JZ while sticking a finger up at Cyril Ramaphosa’s government. It doesn’t look like they are planning to limit the how many people turn up:

“Everyone is welcome. No accreditation is required. People are encouraged to bring their own refreshments.”

said the Foundation’s chief spokesweasel, Mzwanele Manyi.

But if they are not taking precautions around the numbers of people present, are they at least putting some other measures in place to ensure that this won’t turn into a huge superspreader event?

Of course they are. They’ve got the big guy – almost as big as JZ himself – in:

“This occasion will take place in KwaZulu-Natal, eThekwini at the place called the People’s Park where God’s atmosphere will ensure that the coronavirus is blown away and not passed between the attendees.”

What (as I have asked so very often before) could go wrong?

And if this method is so successful, why haven’t we already applied it to other public places, like taxis, supermarkets, restaurants and actual public places?

“Sorry sir, you don’t appear to be wearing a mask as per or store’s regulations.”
“Oh, it’s ok, God’s atmosphere means that I can’t pass anything on.”
“Ah yes. Of course. Sorry to have bothered you. Have a great day.”

Could we maybe see if this might work for Ebola or HIV? Or even just the common cold?
How amazing would that be? Think of the millions of lives it could save.
But no, it seems that it’s just the People’s Park in eThekweni.
And even then just on Thursday.

From 10 o’clock.

Bring your own refreshments.

And when asked if JZ himself would be making an appearance?

“Look, as to whether President Zuma is going to be there on that day. Let’s just pray that he is there, but the situation is still fluid because President Zuma is still on medical parole. His condition is a fluid condition. We hope that on that day the doctors will allow him to be there. So we are hoping for the best.”

Is it too much to hope for that the fluid in question is incurable, chronic, runny diarrhoea? I don’t like to wish such nastiness on people generally, but I feel that this guy is a very deserving case.

Too sick to be in prison for contempt of court, very likely just well enough to turn up and sing and dance on a stage in front of his devotees. Bless those doctors and their amazing work.

And God’s atmosphere. Obviously.

Day 561 – Around the world

Geoguessr (see 6000 miles… passim) have updated their UI and their overall offering, including new games, new challenges and more points for doing well.

It’s easier to use, more fun to play, and I’ve become readdicted.

This week, I have mostly been trying my hand at maps of Sheffield and Cape Town.

I should have a decent knowledge of them both, but actually I’ve only managed full marks a couple of times and I really need to improve my speed.

Practice, as they say, makes perfect. So I’m back to it right now.

Day 558 – Certificated

On the day that this was (unofficially) announced:

I got mine. I’m all certificated!

How it works is just that you enter your details, confirm an OTP on your cellphone, and you get a PDF with your vaccination details on it and a PHAT QR code.

“The QR Code generated is not intended to be readable by the general public, it is meant to be used by entities requiring to verify the card’s validity, using a Vaccine Certificate System inbuilt QR scanner which will be available in the near future.” 

I’m not taking a photo of mine for you to have a look at because then you could be me really easily.

But if you want one, just go and get vaccinated and then go here to download your vaccination certificate.

Simples.

It’s going to drive the moonbats MENTAL! Just watch.

Day 555 – A sudden realisation & How to spot the bad guys

Oh My Deity.

Can you even begin to imagine the SA Moonbats if when we get to Day 666 of all this extraordinary mess?

For the record, we’re back down to Level 1 again in SA as of yesterday morning, with an amazing opportunity right in front of us to stop this thing right in its tracks.

Will we take it? Probably not.

I wrote about a week ago about people spreading misinformation about vaccinations, ivermectin and the like. Someone asked me how to know which bits are true; how can we separate those people from the “good guys”. Fortunately, even if you’re not able to see through the BS because you’re not a scientist and you don’t have the time to trawl through someone’s twitter or Facebook history for clues, then there are still super simple signs you can look out for.

The use of the word “tyranny”, for example.

This is Drama Llama-ism and privilege at it’s finest. You might not like our government much (and I’m with you on that), but honestly, get a grip. You’re not – despite your desperate protestations – living in Nazi Germany.

No, this isn’t “jUsT LiKe LiViNg iN nOrTh KoRea”.
You went to the pub last night and they asked you to sanitise your hands when you went in?
Oooh. How very Pyongyang!

“Tyranny” is a good marker because no-one publicly uses “tyranny” to describe how they are living their daily lives, simply because if they were living their daily lives under any sort of tyranny, they wouldn’t be allowed to say anything publicly.

What else? Well, quotes from George Orwell books are a dead giveaway. Especially the one he never wrote:

“In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act”

not George Orwell.

Or any reference to 1984 (which he did write).

And then there are the links to science stories which have been interpreted by right-wing, conservative news sites (generally) from the US. These will inevitably and unswervingly follow the narrative of “Ivermectin good, vaccine bad” (and yes, that was a deliberately chosen root quote, just for fun), and will be from a website whose title will be something along the lines of RationalPatriot dot com, NationalObserver dot org or MaintainingLiberty dot net.

The scientific paper that they review will exist, but it won’t say the things they say it does. If there’s enough fuss about it, the paper’s author might get in touch on twitter and tell them that they didn’t get it right. This inconvenience will be ignored and the story will not be retracted.

Some mention of Bill and Melinda Gates.

Any link to disclose dot tv.

Use of the word “sheeple”.

And then the obvious stuff like: “the vaccines are killing more than the virus”, “covid isn’t real” and “ivermectin prevents/cures covid” (which isn’t real).

I hope this helps in working out what you can believe and what you can’t.