Day 140 – Cape Town Loadshedding schedules 2020

More loadshedding on the way. Everything has broken at Eskom: from the management team, all the way down to the actual generating units.

Stage 2 starts at 8am this morning.

Thankfully:

Most City customers will be shed at Stage 1 as the City is protecting customers from one stage of load-shedding. Stage 2 will apply for Eskom customers.

So if you are in Cape Town, when might you be likely to suffer?

Here’s the information you need, in handy PDF form.

If you’re outside any of the gaily coloured areas on the map in that link, then you need to go to the Eskom website to get your schedule – and check under Stage 2.

Plan ahead. Save electricity. And please wear a mask.

So many instructions.

Day 138 – UFO

Remember when I saw a UFO over Cape Town back in 2012?
That was all happily explained as being an experimental NASA/Space Force/USAF high altitude plane.

And so we happily went back to mocking those people who insist that they see these sort of things on a regular basis.

Well, that was until I glanced through some of the photos I took while out at Muizenberg yesterday. And I saw this:

It seems that the literally thousands of people illegally on the beach yesterday were not alone. Check out that traditionally saucer-shaped object, traversing across the azure skies above False Bay. And I promise you that I haven’t photoshopped it in there (like I have that sort of skill anyway) – this is a genuine image taken with my camera and all I’ve done is cropped it ever so slightly to centre the object.
Here’s the big version so you can have a closer look.

It is – quite clearly – a flying saucer. And weirdly, I’ve lost all my memories of the rest of the public holiday and I have a bit of a sore backside this morning.

But that’s probably down to the copious amounts of Milk Stout I enjoyed while braai’ing in the afternoon.
After all, there can’t be any other reasonable explanation, right?

If anyone else in Cape Town saw anything weird in the skies yesterday, please get in touch.

 

 

 

 

 

Or… I mean… you could just glance at the uncropped version, featuring a Cape Gull dropping a white mussel onto the beach to break it open. And why not? It was about lunchtime.

 

(sorry)

Day 104 – Tenuous tsunami parallels

Let’s make things clear right from the start here.

I’m not saying that Cape Town is going to get hit by a tsunami.
We’ve covered that concern here: something I would strongly advise you to read if you think that people are paranoid about Covid-19. You ain’t seen nothing yet.

They walk among us.

But I digress. Often.

One of the enduring images of the 2004 Indonesian tsunami was the drawback: the water disappearing from the shorelines of beaches and resorts about to be hit by the tsunami, effectively (some would say ‘exactly’) like a huge low tide.

In some places, this drawback was up to a kilometre. And in most cases, there was good correlation between the size of the drawback and the extent of the damage caused by the tsunami that followed.

If we ignore all scientific reason for a moment and apply this clear inverse proportionality to tomorrow’s predicted storm, I think we’re in trouble. Because today’s weather in Cape Town could not be calmer or more beautiful. So still. So clear. So utterly perfect.

Not a cloud in the sky. Not a breath of wind.

If only there were some term that one could use to describe such a period of placid weather ahead of a predicted tempest.

And yet… just out there in the bottom left corner:

A frothing mass of low pressure, general misery, howling winds and all the rain we didn’t get in 2017. All due to begin tomorrow afternoon/evening and then be followed in by a second front on Sunday into Monday.

And our eyes are already on another vicious lump of nastiness heading out of Uruguay towards SA like Luis Suarez’s poor sportsmanship and bad temper in 2010.

And possibly every bit as bitey.

But let’s just get through this weekend first. Here’s what we’re expecting to see at 0800 local time on Friday morning:

Big winds, much rain, huge waves, general unpleasantness.

In all seriousness though, it does look like quite a nasty one, so please look out for your community and maybe consider helping out your local shelter, which will obviously be under more pressure than usual over the next few days.

Day 103 – “Eventful” Thursday

I knew that there was a winter cold front coming through to Cape Town this week. I didn’t know it was a winter cold front like this though…

“The entire weather community in South Africa has eyes on the mammoth cold front developing in the South Atlantic. This system, arriving Thursday, promises to bring heavy rains and widespread snow to a great deal of SA and even Namibia if the system stays on track.
Our forecasts show this system is not only staying on course but is also strengthening substantially and should make for one of the most eventful winter weekend in Southern Africa in many years.”

Ooh.
And yes,that MASSIVE bank of white stuff off the coast of South America is heading our way.

And I’m not saying that it’s going to be big (although it is), but even Cape Agulhas Municipality decided to teach their residents about the basics so that they could be ready, with awesome lines such as this:

Descriptions: Snow
Snow is precipitation in the form of flakes of crystalline water ice that fall from clouds. Since snow is composed of small ice particles, it is a granular material.

Amazing. Who knew?

I’ll be keeping an eye on this (the weather, not the description of snow) as it approaches and update again tomorrow.

Stay home. Stay safe. Stay warm.

Day 102, part 2 – Cape Town from space (2)

Doug Hurley (one half of space duo Bob and Doug) yesterday tweeted some pictures of South African cities (Joburg, Pretoria and Cape Town) taken from the International Space Station.

It’s not the first time we’ve seen Cape Town from space – remember Randy Bresnick’s August 2017 image?

I’ve rotated Doug’s image to make it more recognisable and conventional.

False Bay at the bottom, Table Bay top left (with spots of light from ships moored on the anchorage), Somerset West and Strand bottom right. All white Stellenbosch (I mean with LED street lighting, not exclusively race) middle right.

Four and a half million people in just 50cm². Amazing