Day 305 – Productive Monday

I’m squeezing in a quick blog post now, because I have a piano lesson to facilitate and then a school meeting to attend and I have been extraordinarily productive this morning. Delivering bread, buying drugs (careful now), making and then taking charity sandwiches to the farm stall for distribution, organising a door repair, assisting with homeschooling and managing a quick (ok, short, not quick) run as well.

Not only that, but dinner is already bubbling away on the stove (and smelling really good), and it’s not anywhere near dinner time yet. The organisation is

On. Point.

And if I can make this post happen fairly quickly, I might even manage to pack a box or two before I’m needed elsewhere.

I’m not like this every day (in fact, I’m very much not like this at all on most days), and so I have to make the most of it when I am.

Which is exactly why I’m not going to get distracted with 1500 words about our Covid situation or the human firepool which is Refilwe Mtsweni-Tsipane’s maskless appearance at the weekend or even our progress to the fifth round of the FA Cup.

Right, time to stir the pot and then pack all my shoes. Well, most of my shoes.

I’m not making that mistake again.

Day 284 – Catching up

I said yesterday that my plan was to do a bit of catching up and I did make a start on that, but I didn’t get too far because of one thing and another. I started, obviously, with a run down the blogroll and that was where I came across some rather shocking and upsetting news:

This was from Brian Micklethwait’s blog (the new one, because the old one stopped working properly). He posted it on the 28th December, but as I have mentioned already, I’m only now beginning to get to the internet things that the Agulhas internet wouldn’t let me read last week.

Sorry.

His letter follows on below that introduction and is typically chatty, informative and candid as Brian’s posts always have been. It’s full of honesty over what he has done and what he is facing, but there’s also optimism there, which of course there should be: having a diagnosis – no matter how bad that news may seem – is the first step to being treated and recovering – a road along which I hope Brian is already progressing.

Even if you don’t know of Brian or read his blog, you should click through on this link and take two minutes to read and recognise the courage and the humility of what he writes.

The only part of his letter that I’m going to share here is this:

But, let me now tell you what would really boost my morale.

Tell each other which of my writings you have most liked, and do so just as publicly as you feel inclined. Blogs postings, blog comments, social media, the lot. My circumstances are now no secret. If I do die soon, I would greatly prefer to do this in the knowledge that various things that I have said and written over the years have left behind them a trail of enlightenment and entertainment, and might be fondly remembered, for a while at least.

I know from personal experience just how much of a role morale plays in these situations, and so I’m very happy to do my little bit here.

I’m going to divide this up into two parts. Here’s the first.

There are a lot of specialist blogs out there, concentrating their efforts upon one particular subject: geography, photography, politics, technology, art, sport, or design – and then others even more niche that aim for all the myriad sub-genres within each of those categories. If those are well-written, informative, interesting blogs, then they will always attract an audience who share the same passion and interest for those particular subjects.

It’s far harder to write a popular blog about nothing in particular. For people to want to read that, you have to produce well-written, interesting, informative posts and you have to be ten times better at it because in all likelihood, you cannot rely on the immediate engagement of recognition and a shared interest in the subject matter.

I like to think that I mostly do ok with that sort of thing, and I think that Brian also does a great job. But here’s the thing: it doesn’t actually matter.

And here’s why.

One of the first posts I mentioned on here from BrianMicklethwaitDotCom (the old one when it was still working properly) is one (about shelves!) with a line in it that prompted a complete change in my blogging mindset, and a line that I have returned to again and again and again over the years:

“my most important reader is me”

Indeed:

…every so often I have to remind you people that my most important reader is me, in a few months or years time… this will warm the cockles of my faltering heart, the way me burbling on about the Cold War ending, and what a Good Thing that is, never could. Oooh. I see that in April 2008, I was of the opinion that the Cold War ending was Good. Well, twiddledidee.

And he was absolutely right, wasn’t he? Because now, he can look back over the past 16 years and warm his cockles by remembering and reliving his thoughts at any particular moment during that time. And they don’t have to be hugely important thoughts on hugely important subjects. In fact, it’s probably better when they’re not. They might just be thoughts about the weather, the cricket, the new bus service or a new building in London. They might even be thoughts about shelves. Whatever.

And if people want to join in: well, they can. And they can dip in and out, enjoy, be enlightened and entertained. But blogging for oneself, not caring too much about who chooses to read, agree or disagree with what you are writing – making your most important reader you – means that when you take some time to look back over what you have written, you are absolutely fulfilling the purpose of all that effort you have put in over the years.

That’s a fundamental message which underlies a style of blogging, one which Brian has clearly followed extremely successfully over the years. But the second (shorter) part of this post is about how he has found a few… “different” ways of observing everyday things and made them his own. Because never again will I be able to see “roof clutter” or a “thinned photo“, watch a “billion monkey” “photoing” a landmark – perhaps one of London’s “Big Things” – and not think of Brian.

And when struggling for inspiration for a post on any given day, I will always happily fall back into the welcoming easy-way-out of a “quota photo“.

To the outsider, none of these phrases will mean very much, like some sort of in-joke in a comedy series you’ve never watched. But when you have been reading for years and years*, Brian’s ability to share the mundane and yet keep it fresh, relevant and interesting by dropping it into categories he has created, is pretty special and just another reason that he keeps his regulars coming back for more.

 

Reading back over the past 1000-odd words (oops – well done if you’re still reading this far), this reads like something of an awkward homage. But I’m actually fine with that, because I’ve very much enjoyed reading Brian’s blogs for 15-odd years, and I look forward to reading many more.

And if ever there was a time to let him know, then this would certainly be it.

Get well soon, Brian.
My thoughts are with you from… oh… you know… several thousand miles away.

 

* and I, along with many others, have.

Day 276 – On The Move

We’ve been told to keep ourselves to ourselves this Christmas, and we’re taking that advice seriously.

As I mentioned before, this is no normal Christmas at the end of a very abnormal year.
Hopefully, we will be well back on track by this time next year. Hopefully.

But it doesn’t really matter to us (or to Covid) where we keep ourselves to ourselves, and so we’re going to head down to Agulhas for a few days. None of the excitement of the Struisbaai New Year fireworks to look forward to, sadly, but still the beach and the braai and the sunshine. With the beach hours extended to 6am-7pm, maybe some early morning exercise by the sea as well. And that’s worth a lot.

I don’t expect that we will have any interaction with anyone other than the odd shopkeeper, much as we would here in Cape Town, and so I’m at peace with the fact that we’re leaving one home for another for a few days. We’re not putting anyone in any danger, and we’re keeping ourselves safe as well.

Check out my Instagram for regular* updates.

 

* T&Cs apply

Day 238, part 2 – An interesting day

Interesting for starters because of the fact that you’re probably wondering what happened to Day 238, part 1.

Well, paradoxically, while that’s written and saved on the back end of the blog right here, I haven’t published it yet, because it could be detrimental to events in real life and so I’m saving it until everything is done, dusted and… and… something else beginning with D.

I’ll let you know.

You may remember that I was struggling a little yesterday having endured a night of insomnia. Well, I took a little tablet last night and slept very soundly indeed, thank you very much. Less good were the continued effects of the dosage until about 11 this morning, because I had a real day to get through. Still, it appears that I have managed to survive and the afternoon even went rather well. There’s big news that I can’t quite share yet.

I know – that’s already two things I can’t tell you about, which is a bit crap. There might be more than two, but I can’t recall very much about this morning, I’m afraid.

We’ll get there, I promise.

Sadly, given the trials and tribulations of the last few days, I haven’t really got around to checking in on the latest on the virus or the local (or even international) news. I have a vaccine post planned for the near future and after today’s events (see above) (or rather don’t) there’s suddenly every chance that I might now have the time to write it.

Right, enough of this cryptic crap. Let’s see what tomorrow brings. Hopefully something rather better and more entertaining than this drivel. Thanks for staying with it this long.
Or commiserations – whichever.